Tag Archives: project

Ombre Paint Chip Calendar

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You may have seen in my Inspiration Around the Web post from a while back that I’ve been wanting to make a paint chip calendar. Well, here it is!

This is definitely one of the easier projects you can make if you are gutsy enough to take like 50 paint chips from your local hardware store. I had to get up the courage, but I managed to get out of Lowe’s without any really awkward looks from the employees.

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For this project, you’ll need:

  • Large frame, preferably with glass rather than plastic
  • 7 paint chips in 6 colors (42 total)
  • Glue
  • Thin poster board
  • Paper cutter and/or scissors
  • Ruler
  • Pencil

First, cut your poster board to the size of your frame. Based on the size of your frame and poster board, measure how large to cut your paint chips. I did this by dividing the length (12 in) by 6, which suggested that I cut my paint chips to 2 inches long. Then I used a pencil to mark every two inches, plus a little extra space between the squares to assure myself this would be accurate. I did the same for the width (18 in), diving by 7, which told me to cut them approximately 2.5 inches wide.

Set aside one color of paint chips – these will be your days of the week. On a 12 x 18 inch poster, I cut the remaining 5 colors down to 2 x 2.5 inches, and arranged them from dark to light with about 1/4 inch space in between.

They should also be spaced out so that there is enough space at the top to write the name of the month. Take the color you set aside (in my case, this was the darkest color) and cut it  .5 x 2.5 inches. I wrote the days of the week in Sharpie, but I would certainly recommend using stickers or a stencil to spell out the days. I went for the cheap option.

When you’re satisfied with the layout, begin gluing the pieces to the poster board using either sticky squares or liquid glue. I chose sticky squares because it’s my go-to choice for any paper projects. I don’t like the potential residue or outlines left by liquid glue, especially when I’m gluing so many pieces. Plus, by using sticky squares, it’s easier to pick up and adjust the squares if you mess up.

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Once everything is glued down, carefully pop the poster board into your frame and start writing! Another suggestion (for a larger canvas), use a lever punch to create a circular hole in the upper corner of each square to serve as a placeholder for your days of the month. I couldn’t sacrifice the writing space, but on a larger canvas you can.

Now it looks great on my desk at work! After almost three months on the job, my desk still looks pretty empty, so it’s nice to have something taking up space.

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Chalkboard Clipboard

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Now that Andrew and I officially share a grocery list, among other things, I wanted an easy way for us to keep track of what we needed for our next trip to the store. I have a million of those notepads that stick to the fridge, but the need for a pen always deters me from actually using them. Instead, I found a way to keep track that also hides easily – a chalkboard clipboard.

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To make a chalkboard clipboard, you’ll need:

  • A clipboard (duh)
  • Chalkboard paint (duh)
  • Chalk (duh)
  • Masking or painters tape
  • Medium-sized paint brush
  • String
  • Liquid glue

Start off by taping a line across the top of the clipboard. I did this because trying to paint underneath/behind the clip would have been an unnecessary hassle. Start painting the bottom part with well-mixed chalkboard paint, including the sides. I find that chalkboard paint can be a little streaky, so take that into consideration when choosing a paint brush. Paint a couple coats until the bottom portion of the clipboard is covered. Once dry, remove the tape.

Before you start using your clipboard, you’re supposed to slate it. Run the side of a piece of chalk down the entirety of your chalkboard and then use a damp paper towel to wipe it clean. This acts as a setting for the paint.

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Next,  cut a piece of string about 12 inches long and use a small amount of glue to wrap the string around the end of a piece of chalk. Once wrapped, tie around and in a knot to hold it. Then tie the opposite end to the top of the clipboard and set your chalk on the clip as you would a pen – this way, you’ll never lose the chalk.

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You can also add a piece of patterned washi tape at the top and write on it with Sharpie for your title. I dubbed mine “the list,” so that whenever we say we need something, we can just say, “Put it on the list!”

Use a nail or, in my case, push pin to hang the clipboard inside a cupboard or on your wall. I love having it inside the cupboard so it’s mostly out of sight but comes in handy when I need it. In a matter of minutes, I turned a ratty old clipboard I never used into a very useful chalkboard.

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Stud Earring Jewelry Box

IMG_3643 I’ve only had my ears pierced for a little over a year now, but I quickly started collecting earrings. I love earrings and find myself looking at them everywhere I go. At first, I would put all of my studs in a small glass catch-all bowl I picked up at IKEA. Then I accumulated more and more earrings, and it would take me five minutes to dig through the bowl to find what I was looking for. A while back, I came up with one earring storage solution with my lace earring tree for longer, dangly ones, but the studs were another story. Finally, I found a solution – a jewelry box. It sounds so obvious now, and it was one of the easiest projects that I’ve made.

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You’ll need a shallow, wooden box that is wide enough to fit a pencil. I found the perfect one at Michael’s for just $5 (plus a coupon)! You will also need approximately eight unsharpened pencils, a hot glue gun, approximately eight pieces of felt, and some craft paint with paint brushes.

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First, I painted the box white. I wanted something simple to blend in with the rest of my room since my dresser is already really crowded. While you wait for it to dry, cut the sides of the felt to match the width of the inside of the box. Mine was 8.5 inches wide. I chose black to stand out against the white, but my black or dark colored earrings blend in a little too well. I’d suggest a different color. Using the hot glue gun, glue the pencil to the very end of the felt and begin rolling it so that the felt curls tightly around the pencil. Glue the end of the felt to the wrapped portion. This should fit somewhat snuggly inside the box. Do that to all of your pencils. I used eight total because of the size of my box, but for the last roll, I cut the felt so that the roll would be thinner than all of the others. The last roll needed to be thinner to fit inside the box without making the others too crammed together, and without the last roll there was too much space.

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Then add in your studs and enjoy! It’s quick, easy and very efficient. And I live for efficient!